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The federal government is set to allocate $3.4 billion in funding to complete the next phase of New York City's long-delayed Second Ave

The federal government is set to allocate $3.4 billion in funding to complete the next phase of New York City's long-delayed Second Ave

The federal government is set to allocate $3.4 billion in funding to complete the next phase of New York City's long-delayed Second Ave. subway project, as announced by Senator Chuck Schumer and Representative Adriano Espaillat.

"This is the largest Capital Investment Grant in the history of the program," Schumer stated. "This grant is significant not only in its size but also in where it's going. The funds will be used to build public transit in a neighborhood that has been neglected for far too long."

This funding is part of a full funding grant agreement from the Federal Transit Administration, intended to support new transit construction projects and expansions.

The next phase of the Second Ave. subway line will connect the eastern section of Harlem to the Q train at E. 96th St. and Second Ave, with additional service at E. 106th St. and E. 116th St. The track will then turn west and connect with the No. 4, 5, and 6 trains at E. 125th St. and Lexington Ave.

Residents in this area have been without train service for decades, as the Second Ave. elevated line ceased service north of 59th St. in the 1940s, and the Third Ave. elevated line stopped serving East Harlem and the Bronx in the 1950s.

The estimated $7.7 billion net cost for "Phase 2 construction support activities" includes site preparation, design, and real estate costs for the new tunnel and subway stations. The FTA funding of $3.4 billion is currently undergoing a two-week congressional review period next month.

The MTA has not provided an updated completion date for Phase 2, and construction is still pending for certain aspects, such as relocating utilities and acquiring necessary properties for station access. The Second Ave. subway project, first proposed in 1920, began construction in the 1970s but faced delays due to financial crises. Partial service was finally introduced in 2017, serving as the three northernmost stations on the Q line. The MTA plans to continue with two additional phases of construction to create a total of four phases, ultimately connecting 125th St. to Hanover Square in lower Manhattan as the T line.

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